By Bonnie Beth Silvestri, JD, Director of Strategic Communications

“Just call Louis.”

Louis GrayLouis Gray is the Office of Community Engagement and Partnerships “go-to” person in USF Registrar’s Office, helping OCEP fulfill its mission to support the service-learning curriculum on campus. Gray, the Registrar’s Office’s Academic Services Administrator, has been working behind the scenes, under the leadership of his supervisor Tony Embry and USF Registrar Angela Debose, coding each service-learning class offered on campus in Banner, the university’s administrative information system.

Once the courses are coded, students are able to easily find service-learning offerings in OASIS; and OCEP can calculate the number of service-learning course sections and students enrolled. During the last academic school year, there were 188 sections of service-learning courses coded in the system, and over 4,000 students enrolled in these courses, which is a significant increase thanks to outreach efforts by OCEP and the Registrar’s Office.

And, it is no surprise that OCEP can count on Gray to help with these efforts, because he “gets it,” and he lives it. A natural connector, Gray said, “I’m the type to bring the community together.”

To that end, Gray started a Tampa-based nonprofit called G.R.A.Y.S. Project Inc. (Granting At-Risk Adolescents and Youth Sustainability), to provide the kind of support system for young people that he wished he had growing up in the Lake Mann Housing Project in Orlando.

Through his eponymous nonprofit, Gray devotes evenings and weekends to tutoring young people of all ages with their schoolwork and to helping high school students with their college entrance exam preparation. Gray’s Project also partners with Second Chance Center for Boys & G3 Life Applications to provide tutoring, life coaching, and ACT Test prep to the local high school students.

Soon, he plans to expand the reach of Gray’s Project to Orlando to strengthen his partnership with Orlando’s Parramore Kidz Zone, one of eleven sites to receive a Promise Neighborhood Grant through the National League of Cities, in conjunction with the White House’s black male achievement initiative. Parramore Kidz Zone is a model program in an historically black neighborhood that has been making a difference. Additionally, the local Housing Authority has requested that he return to his roots in Lake Mann to tutor and mentor the youngest residents at its onsite Kids Cafe.

Lake Mann

Lake Mann Police Department

He mused, “the projects…think about that word,” while remembering his childhood in Lake Mann.  His first eighteen years living in government-subsidized housing, often referred to as “the projects,” was challenging. There was a police presence there, but he called it a “mirage.” He said, it was more about “getting to know you to arrest you,” than to protect and serve the residents.

Gray’s work is completely self-funded, but he also relies on the help of others to keep his programs going. “When you give, give, give, people go above and beyond.”

USF student volunteers with Gray's Project

USF student volunteers with Gray’s Project

Gray has enlisted a corps of volunteers, including twelve USF students and ten working professionals, to tutor and mentor young people.

Gray's Parents

Gray’s Parents

He credits his parents with giving him the support and structure that kept him on the forward trajectory that eventually led him to earning his MBA and working in academia. He said, “Family is key. Studies show family support and structure in the house [determine whether] you succeed or fail in life.”

He said that his father, who worked as a sharecropper as a child and drove a truck throughout his adult life, was home every night with his ten children. Gray’s dad told his son stories of working hard in the fields, only to get “scraps” from the owners of the farm. This made him wary of the predatory lending schemes often marketed to minority communities and informed his decision to raise his family in government-subsidized housing.

Gray is the youngest and his family refers to him as “baby boy.” He said, “We had to be in the house by the time the street lights came on or we would get in trouble.” He said that his father was both stern and playful with the large and loving family.

His mother, who worked as a housekeeper, and his father valued family dinners, getting eight hours of sleep, and a nutritious breakfast every morning before school. He said that wasn’t the case for many of his contemporaries who were often allowed to stay out late and/or would go to school hungry, which made it difficult for them to concentrate in school.

As part of his school district’s efforts to integrate the local school system, Gray attended middle school eight miles away and high school ten miles away from his home. He said, “I really think it was successful. It broke down a lot of barriers, [e.g.,] how you relate to different races as you get older.”

He was an enterprising young person, starting a small candy store and a cookie and juice stand marketed to other children. He believes he had an “internal drive to overcome his situation.”

Even with his family’s support, however, he realizes that in many ways the deck was stacked against him. He said that his lens was always “that’s just the way it is.”

After graduating from high school, he said he “stumbled across a job at Valencia Community College delivering mail from campus to campus.” He got free tuition, so he started taking one or two classes at a time over a fourteen-year period and obtained an Associate of Arts degree. Then, he completed his Bachelor of Arts at Columbia College, Orlando branch, and went on to earn an MBA from the Keller Graduate School of Management, while working in different administrative roles at Valencia Community College. In 2012, shortly before finishing his MBA, he began working at USF.

“I had to find it,” he said. “No one said, ‘your goal is to go to college.’ It wasn’t even expected for me to go to college. Fourteen years later, I was still delivering mail. In another culture, college would have been pushed on me.” Now, he wants to be that voice to say to young people, “don’t give up, keep going, keep pushing.”

Gray said he has seen “so many struggles in our country and how people just gave up and settled.” Gray’s Project, he said, is designed “to uplift, give promise and hope to all individuals.”

“I look like them,” he said; and he tells them, “I’m from where you are.” He hopes to inspire young people, “not to say, look at me, I’ve got so much, but [to show] what you can be if you stay focused.”

Gray's Family

Gray’s Family

Gray takes time away from his own family to work with local children, which can be difficult. But as soon as he reaches them, and connects with them, it makes it worthwhile. When they ask, “Mr. Louis, are you coming back next Saturday?” he knows he is making a difference in their lives.

In addition to his work mentoring and tutoring, Gray educates young people about the “school-to-prison pipeline.” When children are expelled, the rate of those going to prison increases tremendously. He said that he wants young people to be aware that they need to be very careful; because discipline can be meted out in a biased way impacting minority communities.

Gray is also very active on campus, including serving as the Vice Chair of the Student and Presidential Advisory Committee on Black Affairs (COBA), which advises the President on matters affecting Black faculty, staff, and students of the University.

In the fall, Gray plans to begin a Post Master’s Leadership in Higher Education graduate certificate with a goal of working toward a PhD.

He will also begin teaching Academic Foundations; and he plans to add a service-learning component into the course. Students will be able to volunteer with Gray’s Project or with the Moffitt Center.

He will incorporate his strong will to persevere into the course. “That will be a story that I can share with incoming students.”

To learn more about how you can get involved, go to Gray’s Project.  For more about the Parramore Kidz Zone, click here.  For more on the school-to-prison pipeline, click here for “Demanding Zero Tolerance for Florida’s School- to-Prison Pipeline.”

 

11 thoughts on “From “the Projects” to Gray’s Project: A Profile of Louis Gray

  • June 20, 2014 at 10:35 pm
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    Louis very proud of you my brother I very much look forward to supporting “Gray’s Project”

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    • June 26, 2014 at 1:16 pm
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      Thanks for the kind words….Trying to make a difference in our community “One Child at a Time”

      Reply
  • June 23, 2014 at 6:13 pm
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    Boy I remember back in the days when we used to ride bicycles together going up to the YMCA downtown fashion square mall and the underground park going to school together and playing basketball to you’ve always been a good influence for all of us and I would like to say as your friend for a long time that I am so very proud of you and I just like to say that I pray that God blesses you with all your endeavors and that love you brother

    Reply
  • June 26, 2014 at 6:35 pm
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    Louis is providing a much needed service to communities throughout the state of Florida. His passions, skills and dedication is needed and appreciated. I hope he understands how much his efforts are making an impact of so many people. When support anad educate our youth you educate their parents and the entire community. PLEASE, keep up the fantastic work. Brick by Brick.

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  • June 27, 2014 at 7:59 pm
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    I AM SO PROUD OF YOU LOUIS GRAY AND HIS TEAM ! WHEN YOU BRING GRAY’S PROJECT TO ORLANDO I WOULD BE HONORED TO BE A VOLUNTEER WITH YOUR ORGANIZATION. GREAT JOB !!! I LOVE TO READ ABOUT SOMEONE LEAVING ORLANDO AND TURNING THEIR SUCCESS INTO HELPING IN THE COMMUNITY!!!! GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR ORGANIZATION HEAVEN IS THE LIMITS!!!

    Reply
  • June 27, 2014 at 10:40 pm
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    Kudos to my brother in law . He’s an awesome man, father, husband, friend and mentor. Keep up the GOOD work.

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  • July 1, 2014 at 9:32 am
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    Thanks again for the comments, It really does take a Village to raise our under represented youth.

    Reply
  • July 1, 2014 at 9:56 am
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    What an AWESOME Charge! You are what our communities need.

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  • July 2, 2014 at 2:03 pm
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    Thats so nice making everybody proud. Family, friends and the hood (Lake Mann) keep up the good work

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  • September 20, 2014 at 2:01 pm
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    I like to say congratulation on your success, and thanks for all the help on tutoring my kids they have improved alot.

    Reply

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